THE PEOPLE

Principal Investigator

Elizabeth Tricomi​

Associate Professor

Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh

B.S., Cornell University

etricomi (at) psychology.rutgers.edu

 

Broadly speaking, my research focuses on the influences of affective information on cognitive processing in the brain. The affective qualities of our experience not only produce subjective feelings that may be positive or negative, but also provide information that allows us to shape future behavior. To understand how the consequences of ones decisions can be used to determine future actions, I use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the role of the brains reward processing system in feedback-based learning. My work examines contextual influences on learning and decision making, and the neural systems that underlie these processes. For example, my research indicates that the sensitivity of the striatum, a region in the basal ganglia, to reward-related information depends on factors such as whether one feels a sense of agency in producing an outcome or whether a habit has been formed after extensive experience. This research has important implications for understanding how cognitive processes such as learning and decision making are carried out in the normal brain, as well as for understanding how impairments of the brains reward processing system may give rise to disorders such as addiction and other compulsive behaviors.

Graduate Student, Fourth Year

Chris Cagna

P.h.D. Candidate - Rutgers University 

M.S., Seton Hall University 

B.A., Seton Hall University 

christopher.cagna (at) rutgers.edu

 

My broad research interests include the influences of motivation and decision-making processes on cognitive performance, as well as how this relationship is represented within the brain. Currently, I am investigating how to make performance feedback (especially negative feedback) more rewarding – more specifically, how to enhance reward valuation of the relevant information that feedback provides (despite potential costs associated with obtaining it – e.g., being wrong), and how to consequently augment people’s feedback-seeking behavior. In addition to behavioral methods, I utilize functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to better understand the neural mechanisms of contextual factors that shape the valuation processes underlying this form of decision-making, and their impact on cognitive performance.  My goal is to apply this line of work to feedback-based cognitive interventions used within clinical populations, such as multiple sclerosis, as I believe that this research may have implications for optimizing intervention success rate by improving participant engagement.

Graduate Student, First Year

Wesley Ameden

Graduate Student - Rutgers University

B.S., University of Vermont

wesley.ameden (at) rutgers.edu

Broadly, I am interested in the processes by which humans learn and make decisions, the influences of context, feedback, and cognitive biases, and the reasons that individuals or groups act in ways that sabotage their goals. I hope to conduct research that combines psychology and neuroscience methodologies with behavioral economics to expand on what we know about human behavior. More specifically, I am interested in applying this research to study and nudge behavior in many areas including personal goals, health, resource management, substance use and abuse, climate-conscious actions, and more.

Lab Manager / Research Assistant

James Perrotta

Completing B.A., Rutgers University, Newark

jap542 (at) psychology.rutgers.edu

My broad research interests include almost all topics found in industrial-organizational psychology. However, more specifically, I take a keen interest in optimizing personnel selection, lowering employee turnover rates, and figuring out valid and reliable ways to holistically test performance. When it comes to the Learning & Decision Making lab, I'm interested in how motivational and big five personality traits influence feedback-seeking frequency and valence.

Research Assistants as of Spring 2020

James Perrotta

Undergraduate Research Assistant 

Working with: Chris Cagna

Address

Learning and Decision Making Lab

Rutgers-Newark Psychology Dept

4-103 Smith Hall

101 Warren Street

Newark, NJ 07102

© 2016 by Elizabeth Tricomi
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